Radio Blue Heart is on the air!
fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

U.S. imperialism out of Africa! 
Chinese poster circa 1960

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

U.S. imperialism out of Africa!

Chinese poster circa 1960

vicemag:

There’s No Such Thing as a ‘Non-Lethal’ Weapon
Late last month, the spill of headlines calling out the Hong Kong authorities’ use of non-lethal weapons against democracy demonstrators gathered international attention and condemnation from NGOs like Human Rights Watch. For onlookers in the US, such news dovetailed with a St. Louis neighborhood’s standoff with riot police that spread 12 miles north, where yet another young black man was recently shot and killed by an off-duty officer.
From the 1960s Civil Rights movement to the Arab Spring, these events fall in line with a decades-long history of televised protests during which police weaponry has alarmed the media, activists, and the public. The use of non-lethal weapons on civilians (like the use of any type of weapon on anybody) is often the spark that leads to city streets devolving into war zones and the police beginning to act like an army. Deaths, accidental or otherwise, start to pile up.
But we should be clear about something: There’s really no such thing as a “non-lethal” weapon. A weapon’s lethality is, ultimately, not up to the object itself. Arguing otherwise is an attempt to shift one of our greatest moral responsibilities onto an inanimate object that has no agency.
Continue

vicemag:

There’s No Such Thing as a ‘Non-Lethal’ Weapon

Late last month, the spill of headlines calling out the Hong Kong authorities’ use of non-lethal weapons against democracy demonstrators gathered international attention and condemnation from NGOs like Human Rights Watch. For onlookers in the US, such news dovetailed with a St. Louis neighborhood’s standoff with riot police that spread 12 miles north, where yet another young black man was recently shot and killed by an off-duty officer.

From the 1960s Civil Rights movement to the Arab Spring, these events fall in line with a decades-long history of televised protests during which police weaponry has alarmed the media, activists, and the public. The use of non-lethal weapons on civilians (like the use of any type of weapon on anybody) is often the spark that leads to city streets devolving into war zones and the police beginning to act like an army. Deaths, accidental or otherwise, start to pile up.

But we should be clear about something: There’s really no such thing as a “non-lethal” weapon. A weapon’s lethality is, ultimately, not up to the object itself. Arguing otherwise is an attempt to shift one of our greatest moral responsibilities onto an inanimate object that has no agency.

Continue

gorgeousprettybeauty:

Demons (1985)

horroroftruant:

"Halloween" (1978) | John Carpenter

The Deadthings - Cemetery Mary

Ramones - Pet Sematary
4,603 plays

art-and-fury:

Ramones - Pet Sematary

rhamphotheca:

Leaders of the Pack:
Not everyone was happy when wolves returned to Yellowstone (the deer, for one), but the place is better with them there.  
 by Rocky Kistner 
Wyoming wolves had reason to howl in victory last month when a federal court gave them back their protected status under the Endangered Species Act. A judge ruled that the state’s management of the species—which included a shoot-on-sight policy and a trophy-hunting range—was inadequate for sustaining a viable wolf population. (Disclosure: NRDC, OnEarth’s publisher, was a plaintiff in the case.)
Since the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed the gray wolf from the endangered species list in Wyoming in 2012, hunters have killed more than 200 of the animals in the state. For those who think that’s okay, this video is for you…
(read more: On Earth)
photograph by Shawn Kinkade

rhamphotheca:

Leaders of the Pack:

Not everyone was happy when wolves returned to Yellowstone (the deer, for one), but the place is better with them there.

Wyoming wolves had reason to howl in victory last month when a federal court gave them back their protected status under the Endangered Species Act. A judge ruled that the state’s management of the species—which included a shoot-on-sight policy and a trophy-hunting range—was inadequate for sustaining a viable wolf population. (Disclosure: NRDC, OnEarth’s publisher, was a plaintiff in the case.)

Since the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed the gray wolf from the endangered species list in Wyoming in 2012, hunters have killed more than 200 of the animals in the state. For those who think that’s okay, this video is for you…

(read more: On Earth)

photograph by Shawn Kinkade

mastersofthe80s:

The Boogey Man (1980)